Graduated compression stockings to prevent and treat venous insufficiency

Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research
Record ID 31998008926
English
Authors' objectives: This report has been produced in response to a request for information on the effectiveness of different pressure gradients in graduated compression stockings used to prevent and treat venous insufficiency. There was interest in information on the comparative effectiveness of 25 mmHg and 30 mmHg graduated pressures in treating venous insufficiency, and in guidelines on the minimum pressure to be used in the management of various conditions.
Authors' recomendations: There are no published prospective RCTs comparing effectiveness of different graduated pressures exerted by GCSs used to prevent and treat conditions caused by venous insufficiency. The wide use of GCSs to prevent and treat various clinical conditions is mostly based on empirical grounds. Although evidence supporting their use for specific clinical conditions is inconclusive, medical and nursing practitioners accept their value in clinical practice. There is no consensus on the optimal graduated pressure that should be exerted by GCSs used to prevent and treat specific clinical conditions related to venous insufficiency. From the information obtained it is not possible to state whether an exerted graduated pressure of 25 mmHg is more effective than a minimum graduated pressure of 30 mmHg in treating venous insufficiency.
Authors' methods: Review
Details
Project Status: Completed
Year Published: 1997
English language abstract: An English language summary is available
Publication Type: Not Assigned
Country: Canada
MeSH Terms
  • Bandages
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Varicose Veins
  • Venous Pressure
  • Leg
  • Venous Insufficiency
Contact
Organisation Name: Institute of Health Economics
Contact Address: 1200, 10405 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 3N4. Tel: +1 780 448 4881; Fax: +1 780 448 0018;
Contact Name: djuzwishin@ihe.ca
Contact Email: djuzwishin@ihe.ca
Copyright: Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research
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