Evaluation of a telepsychiatry pilot project

Doze S, Simpson J
Record ID 31998008424
English
Authors' objectives: Pilot project linking Alberta Hospital Ponoka and five general hospitals to evaluate feasibility and usefulness of telepsychiatry services in central Alberta.
Authors' results and conclusions: The most common reason for referral was the management of a previously established diagnosis. Fifty-five percent of all consumers had a history of mental illness longer than one year. The most prevalent diagnosis was depression (40%). 32% of all consumers were considered to have suicide ideation or suicidal intent at the time of referral. The technology was considered easy to use, and the quality of the sound and picture were appropriate for the application. Survey data suggested strong acceptance and satisfaction by consumers, service providers, and psychiatric consultants. Benefits perceived by consumers included timeliness of service, service in their own community with no travel-related stressors, decreased work time loss, and positive outcomes as a result of psychiatrist expertise.
Authors' recomendations: Information gathered during this evaluation suggests that the use of video conferencing equipment for psychiatric consultations should be considered when planning for an integrated community-based mental health service. In addition, the use of video conferencing technology should be considered for other mental health applications.
Authors' methods: Primary research, Evaluation study
Details
Project Status: Completed
Year Published: 1997
English language abstract: An English language summary is available
Publication Type: Not Assigned
Country: Canada
MeSH Terms
  • Remote Consultation
  • Telemedicine
  • Psychiatry
Contact
Organisation Name: Institute of Health Economics
Contact Address: 1200, 10405 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 3N4. Tel: +1 780 448 4881; Fax: +1 780 448 0018;
Contact Name: djuzwishin@ihe.ca
Contact Email: djuzwishin@ihe.ca
Copyright:

Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, 1997

This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA or other HTA producer. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database.